• M Aerospace RTC

Know the best resin 3D printers

The popularity of 3D resin printers is surging now that the technology involved is more affordable for consumers and small businesses.


While the first wave of cheap resin printers opened the eyes of many to the quality of the devices, their capabilities and the possibilities they bring, the first resin 3D printers were all very small in size. Some users may be happy with a small resin vat, but others need larger build volumes to accommodate larger and more ambitious projects.


With increasing demand and technological advances, a bevy of affordable mid to large size printers appeared on the market, and the number of large resin 3D printers is growing and growing.


SLA technology printers are becoming more popular for good reason. What was once thousands of dollars worth of technology is advancing to another year of countless machines capable of producing incredibly detailed prints in almost no time at all. And best of all: they've become ridiculously cheap, and they're getting better all the time.


This article covers the best resin 3D printers from small to large sizes, from low-end printers geared for home makers to high-end options for businesses that are willing to invest more in a resin 3D printer.


3D Printer

Construction volume (mm) (L x W x H)

Resolution (μm)

Approximate price (USD)

Creality HALOT-ONE

127 x 80 x 160

XY: 51

Z: 10


$229

Anycubic Photon Mono 4K

132 x 80 x 165

XY: 35 @ 4K (3840x2400) px

Z: 10


$289

Elegoo Mars 3

143 x 90 x 165

XY: 35

Z: 10

$350

Anycubic Photon Mono SE

130 x 78 x 160

XY: 51 @ 2K (2560x1620) px

Z: 10

$239

Elegoo Mars 2

129 x 80 x 150

XY: 50

Z: 10

$199

Voxelab Proxima 6

130 x 82 x 155

XY: 50

Z: 25

$169-229

Creality LD-002H

130 x 82 x 160

XY: 51

Z: 30

$239

Nova3D Bene4 Mono

130 x 80 x 150

XY: 50

Z: 10

$280

Anycubic Photon Mono

130 x 80 x165

XY: 51 @ 2K (2560 x 1620) px Z: 10

$199

Phrozen Sonic Mini 4K

135 x 75 x 130

XY: 35

Z: 10

$349

Anycubic Photon Mono X

192 x 120 x 245

XY: 50

Z: 10

$550

Phrozen Sonic Mighty 4K

200 x 125 x 220

XY: 52

Z: 10

$599

Original Prusa SL1S Speed

120 x 68 x 150

XY: 47

Z: 10

$1,999

Anycubic Photon Mono X 6K

245 x 197 x 122

​XY: 34 @ 6K (5760 x 3600) px

Z: 10

$660

Elegoo Saturn

​192 x 120 x 200

XY: 50

Z: 10

$500

Epax E10 Mono

192 x 120 x 250

XY:50

Z:10

$699

Elegoo Jupiter

277 x 156 x 300

XY: 51

Z:10

$1,300

Phrozen Sonic Mega 8K

330 x 185 x 400

XY: 43

Z: 10

$1,699

Peopoly Phenom Prime

275 x 155 x 400

XY:51

Z:10


$2,799

Phrozen Transform

290 x 160 x 400

XY: 76 (47 en modo dual)

Z:10

$1,999


Creality HALOT-ONE




The Halot-One has a monochrome LCD display with 2K resolution, WiFi connectivity, a 5-inch color touchscreen to operate the printer and a respectable 130 x 82 x 160 mm build volume. For the most part, it has similar specifications to the Creality LD-002H. With a resolution of 2560 x 1620 pixels it gives us a print granularity (XY) of 50 microns, which is somewhat average for the low-budget sector. This means that quality prints are possible but will be no better or worse than the competition.

It is worth mentioning the air purification system of the Halot-One which consists of a fan with an activated carbon filter, similar to the system in the LD-002H. This should help filter out some of the potent odors that are generated when printing resins.


Anycubic Photon Mono 4K




Recognizing the need for higher resolutions, Anycubic brings to the market the Photon Mono 4K as well as its big brother, the Photon Mono 6K. With respect to the Photon Mono the obvious differences are the 4K LCD screen and the 35 micron resolution (XY). The Photon Mono 4K is essentially the same printer except that it doubles the number of pixels. Its 6.23 monochrome LCD panel gives us the same 132 x 80 mm print area and 165 mm for the Z axis. The difference in resolution between the Mono and Mono 4K is a decrease, from 50 microns on the XY axes to just 35 microns.

In addition to being a 4K panel it is also monochrome, which means fast curing times. In other words, fast prints. Layer cure times of 1 to 2 seconds are the norm. Anycubic says it has a print speed of 50 mm/h. According to Anycubic the LCD panel used in the Mono 4K offers a contrast ratio of 400:1 making it twice as good as the original Mono. The increase in contrast means that the image projected on the monochrome LCD has sharper lines and corners, improving print quality. In other words, sharper prints.


Elegoo Mars 3



The Elegoo Mars 3 is our top choice in low-budget resin 3D printers. There are a number of reasons for this. With its 6.6-inch 4K display, it can print at an ultra-fine 35-micron resolution, has a large build volume and brings back the best parts from past iterations making it a balanced machine while still being easy to use and affordably priced. Currently hovering around $350 USD, it includes a one-year subscription ($169 USD) for ChiTuBox Pro slicer software, making the Elegoo Mars 3 not only capable but highly affordable.


The Mars 3 is the sixth version of Elegoo's popular low-budget resin printer. In addition to being the sleekest Mars yet, the printer also comes with several performance advantages. With a build volume of 143 x 90 x 165 mm it is very large for a small resin printer and by including a 4K LCD screen it can print at a fine resolution of 35 microns.


While it is not the first printer to bring 35-micron resolution to the low-budget sector (kudos to the Phrozen Sonic Mini 4K), it does so with considerably more build volume than its competition and predecessors. On top of that, it combines the best parts of its previous iterations into a balanced machine while preserving the same workmanlike attitude for which it has always been appreciated, it works without any complications.


Anycubic Photon Mono SE




Sporting a monochrome LCD display, the printer promises curing times as fast as 1 second per layer. Its LCD screen is 6-inch 2K with 2560 x 1620 pixels as the light source. This gives us a resolution (XY) of 51 microns, combined with Z-axis precision of 10 microns, not the best resolution you can buy on the market, with numbers as low as 30 microns on the XY axes but the level of detail is so fine on the Photon Mono SE that it is indistinguishable to the naked eye.


One benefit of using a monochrome LCD is that the lifetime of the display is extended, offering thousands of hours of use unlike its non-monochrome (RGB) counterparts. Users of the Photon Mono SE will have a build volume of 130 x 78 x 160 mm at their disposal. This is slightly above average compared to its competitors in the low-budget segment, beating out its predecessor Anycubic Photon S, Elegoo Mars Pro and Phrozen Sonic Mini 4K.


Elegoo Mars 2



Being the direct predecessor of the Mars 3, the Elegoo Mars 2 remains our basic low-budget resin 3D printer option. It is close to being (but not quite, see the Voxelab Proxima) the cheapest mono-LCD resin printer and offers a fine printing experience. With simple software and on-board operation, installation is child's play and the build plate is one of the easiest to level. Of course, the print quality is also good, but the big difference between this printer and the Mars 3 is that the Mars 3 produces slightly more granular prints.


In many ways, the Elegoo Mars 2 is the quintessential low-budget resin printer. You get a monochrome LCD for even faster cure times, the familiarity of use for which the original Elegoo Mars is valued, the standard resolution for its size of 50 microns in the XY axes, arranged for a build volume of 129 x 80 x 150mm.


Natively compatible with ChiTuBox software, a free and easy-to-use slicer software, plus a single-screw leveling system, which is easy to level, all add up to make the Mars 2 a capable and hassle-free printer. Compared to its big brother, the Mars 2 Pro, we see little reason to spend $70 more (approximately), when for all this extra money spent you only get an activated carbon filter that is a pain to replace and a metal resin vat that looks no better than the clear vat of the Mars 2.


If you want to spend more money on an Elegoo resin printer then we recommend the new Mars 3, which offers a slightly larger build volume as well as a higher print resolution. But the Mars 2 stands on its own without much trouble.


Voxelab Proxima 6



The Voxelab Proxima 6 is an aggressively priced resin 3D printer from Flashforge's Voxelab sub-brand. Typically found under $200 USD, the Proxima offers fast prints thanks to its monochrome LCD, in addition to its comfortable build volume of 130 x 82 x 155 mm. This is perhaps the strongest point of the Voxelab Proxima. It is an average printer, but in a good way. Costing less than most of its competition and offering the same print experience and quality it is a safe choice for entering this budget conscious segment.


Boasting 2560 x 1620 pixels in its 130 x 82 mm build area this translates to a horizontal resolution of 50 microns in the XY axes, again putting the Proxima in the same range (even the same build plate) as the Elegoo Mars 2, the Nova3D Bene4 Mono and the Creality LD-002 H found in this article. Compatibility with Voxelab's proprietary software called VoxelMaker may be a cause for concern, since Flashforge's other slicing software, FlashPrint, is generally the weak point of this manufacturer's printers. Not the case here, the Proxima is natively compatible with the ChiTuBox software out of the box.


Creality LD-002H



The Creality LD-002H resin 3D printer is a solid alternative to the Elegoo Mars Pro, with few differences between them other than price. History repeats itself again in the LD-002H, with Creality and Elegoo following in lockstep, as the new LD-002H has broadly the same features as the Elegoo Mars 2 Pro.


Inside this printer, you have a monochrome LCD with a 2K pixel resolution (2560x1620), allowing you fast cure times, air filtration via a replaceable activated carbon filter that is located inside the print chamber, and with a build volume of 130 x 82 x 160 mm. Printable area is standard for this new cohort of monochrome LCD resin printers, which typically have 6-inch LCDs. Pixel size or horizontal resolution (XY) is slightly higher than Creality's LD-002R, growing from 47 to 51 microns.


The LD-002H uses ChiTu firmware and is compatible with ChiTuBox slicing software, a combination that allows for a simple workflow to adjust and print with the machine.


Nova3D Bene4 Mono



The Nova3D Bene4 Mono substantially raises the bar for ease of use and convenience. At around $280 USD, it costs more than other printers with similar print quality, such as the Elegoo Mars 2 and the Voxelab Proxima, but that money difference is visible in several extras, features and design elements that make it simpler and generally more pleasant to use.


WiFi connectivity and 8 GB of internal memory are the first features to highlight, with the former allowing you to conveniently start and monitor your prints from your desktop. The printing plate comes already leveled from the factory, making it very easy for you to get started, especially for those who are new to printing. And it comes with a flip-up lid that gives you full access to the print chamber, an improvement over other low-budget printers with flip-up lids and the other printers with bucket lids found in this article.


It sounds wonderful, and it is, but you have to avoid the proprietary slicer software, NovaMaker, which just causes headaches with its incorrect printer settings and other things that make it unusable. However, the popular slicer software Lychee has full support for this printer with its Bene4 Mono profile, including WiFi connectivity.


Anycubic Photon Mono



The Photon Mono is among Anycubic's most affordable printers and the one with the least features of their offerings. Its main feature is that it has a monochrome LCD panel with 2K resolution, basically it can print fast. Standard resins can be processed with cure times as fast as 2 seconds.


There is not much to distinguish the Mono except its curing times, but that is becoming the norm. This doesn't mean it's not a good printer, because it is. It prints fine details quite well. All things considered, the Mono is a decent printer that prints fast but you have to consider its price relative to the competition.


Phrozen Sonic Mini 4K



Phrozen was the first to bring monochrome LCDs and fast cure times to low-budget resin printers with the Sonic Mini, and got it right a second time with the Sonic Mini's premium successor, the Sonic Mini 4K. As is probably clear, this printer has an LCD display with 4K resolution, making high-detail prints with resolutions of 35 microns possible.


With a build volume of 135 x 75 x 130 mm, it doesn't have the largest print dimensions, especially since the capable and similar Elegoo Mars 3 hit the market, but at $350 USD, the Mini 4K still maintains a competitive price point, and we expect in the future it will drop further in price as the Sonic Mini 8K takes its place in the market. If you don't want ultra-high resolution, don't mind the bulk of smaller builds, and for some reason want to avoid Elegoo, then the Phrozen Sonic Mini 4K is the printer for you.


Anycubic Photon Mono X




The Anycubic Photon Mono X is our top choice in large resin 3D printers. It offers a larger build volume than the Elegoo Saturn, comes with some convenience features like remote control, and has recently dropped significantly in price, not least because of the release of the upgraded Mono X 6K version. It is still a solid recommendation today, but, everyone always wants a little more sophistication.


The mid-sized resin 3D printer impresses with its ability to print parts with its 192 x 120 x 245 mm build volume. Like other printers in the article it uses a monochrome LCD display, its 4K resolution gives it a pixel size (XY) of 50 microns, a resolution in line with the smaller and cheaper Elegoo Mars 2 printer, Voxelab Proxima and the Creality LD-002H also found in this article.


Anycubic wants you to use the Photon Workshop software with the Mono X, which is workable. However, we found it lacking compared to the ChiTuBox software used with many other printers. Fortunately you can do just that and drop the Anycubic slicer in favor of ChiTuBox, the same applies to the popular Lychee slicer.


Phrozen Sonic Mighty 4K



The Phrozen Sonic Mighty 4K has a larger build area than many similar printers. A side-by-side comparison with the Anycubic Photon Mono X will make you think they are similar but the Mighty 4K has a slightly larger build area of 200 x 125 mm compared to the Mono X's 192 x 120 mm. It's not as tall, but we consider the surface area more important than the build height.


With a 4K LCD to enable fast prints and competitive print resolution, with a slightly higher pixel count than similar medium/large format machines. However, this is "cancelled out" by the larger print area, leaving it with a pixel size of 52 microns on the X and Y axes, a difference of 2 microns, when compared to the 50 microns of the Mono X, is unnoticeable.


The Sonic Mighty 4K is so named for a reason. With its 9.3-inch monochrome LCD screen and 4K resolution, it offers one of the largest print areas and build volumes in the range in which it competes. Phrozen made compromises with the Mighty 4K, such as only allowing print files to be uploaded via USB, the inability to monitor printing remotely, the quality of the touchscreen as well as design details, such as the tank fixture and switch location. The end result is a decrease in the usability of the printer compared to its competitors.


Original Prusa SL1S Speed



The $1,999 USD price tag of the Original Prus SL1S Speed is not easy to swallow, especially when you consider that the print volume (127 x 80 x 150 mm) and screen resolution (XY) is 49 microns and is on par with resin printers priced under $300 USD from Elegoo, Creality and the rest of the manufacturers. However, value is in the eye of the beholder and the SLS1 Speed excels with a wealth of features that make it easy to use and are designed to ensure a successful print.


The SL1S Speed replaces the SL1, and besides having switched to a monochrome display for faster cure times and a slightly larger build volume, the SL1S Speed retained the same convenience features as its predecessor, resulting in a resin 3D printer that warns you if you are going to run out of resin mid-print. Also, the resin vat tilts after each layer change to separate the resin from the print vat. This measure is used to ensure sharper results, but we did not notice any significant difference from resin printers that do not tilt their vat during printing. Perhaps it is unnecessary but it is unmistakably Prusa, making the SL1S indisputably a premium printer that goes out of its way to justify its high price.


One distinct advantage of the SL1S Speed that is easy to overlook is that there is an abundance of official support documentation and channels to turn to for information on construction, usage, troubleshooting, not to mention the Prusa Printers website, which contains 3D models that were verified to be printed on the SL1S Speed. You're buying more than just hardware, it's an ecosystem.


Anycubic Photon Mono X 6K




The Anycubic Photon Mono X 6K is a resin 3D printer that looks almost the same as the printer with which it shares most of its name but with one crucial difference, it has a 6K resolution LCD screen. This means a resolution (XY) of 34 microns and, in theory, sharper prints. There is also a few millimeters difference in build volume, a new build plate and a better light source.

The new Photon Mono X &k has a 9.25-inch monochrome LCD display with a resolution of 5760 x 3600 pixels compared to the original Mono X's 3840 x 2400, a noticeable increase. However, the size of the LCD panel is not that different, the original Mono X has an 8.9-inch panel so the 9.25-inch panel of the 6K is not enough. The biggest difference is in the resolution, the Mono X has 50 microns on the XY axes while the 6K offers 34 microns of resolution. However, it remains to be seen if you will be able to notice these benefits in the quality of your prints, the promotional information shows them, but will your eyes be able to notice them?


A few millimeters difference in build volume matters little. The Mono X 6K is slightly larger than the Elegoo Saturn but much smaller than jumbo printers like the Elegoo Jupiter and Phrozen Sonic Mega 8K. Incidentally, if you don't need a large build volume why pay more for one.


Fundamentally this printer is an upgrade of the LCD panel to 6K resolution and the other changes are small, which leads us to believe that there will be no noticeable difference in performance. The Mono X 6K should print significantly better than the original Mono X to be recommended.


Elegoo Saturn



The Elegoo Saturn is our choice for large resin printers on a budget. At $500 USD it is the cheapest option for getting started in medium-sized resin 3D printing. While its build volume is not the largest by today's standards, it offers enough space for anyone who wants to get creative without having to spend considerable sums of money. If you want a reliable printer without running out of money, the Saturn is your choice.



The Elegoo Saturn was released in mid-2020 and brought with it a lot of buzz. It brings with it an 8.9-inch monochrome LCD display with 4K resolution with a build volume of 192 x 120 x 200 mm. With 3840 x 2400 pixels across the print surface, it gives us a resolution on the XY axes of 50 microns, all for the paltry sum of $500 USD, a good price for the specs it carries.


We liked its ease of use, reliability and wealth of convenience features such as the elevated resin vat and simple print plate fixture. With its competitive price, it can compete with many of the other offerings in the printer range it resides in, as long as you're not looking for ultra-fine resolution.


Epax E10 Mono



The Epax E10 is the company's debut in the large, low-budget resin printer sector, which is, in some ways, a more affordable version of its flagship printer, the Epax X10. Armed with an 8.9-inch monochrome LCD screen and 4K resolution, as well as a build volume of 192 x 120 x 250 mm, which gives a resolution (XY) of 50 microns, it offers all the benefits of a monochrome LCD that have been mentioned in the article. It is a good printer but nothing out of the ordinary.


However, the versatile display options allow the printer to support any screen between 8.9 and 10.1 inches and can utilize Epax's 10.1-inch 5K resolution display, giving you a print resolution of 45 microns in exchange for a larger print area of 216 x 135 mm, or even Epax's new 10.1-inch panel with 8K resolution, which delivers a resolution of 7680 x 4320 pixels and a pixel size of 28.5 microns. Quite out of the ordinary we'd say. Of course, if you don't currently have an E10 you can skip the upgrades and go straight for an E10 with 5K or 8K resolution.


Elegoo Jupiter



The Jupiter is one of Elegoo's largest printers, with a build volume of 277 x 156 x 300 mm. The 277 x 156 print area is supported by a 12.8 inch monochrome LCD screen, with a 6K resolution of 5448 x 3064 pixels the Jupiter can print at a resolution (XY) of 51 microns, printing the same level of detail as the Saturn but with almost 3 times the build volume.


The Jupiter brings an interesting addition to its specifications with the automatic resin feeding system, with a special screw cap for resin bottles, which allows you to put them upside down in an extension of the resin tank so you will never run out of resin again. Unlike other printers in the article the Jupiter's stock slicer options made it possible for us to get fast prints even with a completely full print bed.


Phrozen Sonic Mega 8K



The Phrozen Sonic Mega 8K is, in our minds, currently the pinnacle of large resin 3D printers and our favorite choice, even over the Photon Mono X. With its massive build volume, impressive resolution and ultra-competitive price, the Mega 8K will be more than a game changer for the large resin printer sector. If you need to print extra large without spending a fortune for the privilege then the Mega 8K should be at the top of your list.


With a build volume of 330 x 185 x 400 mm, it offers one of the largest volumes in commercial resin 3D printers, but it doesn't stop there. While there are a couple of printers of similar dimensions the Mega 8K emphasizes its print resolution with its monochrome LCD display with 8K resolution, a pioneer with its 7680 x 4320 pixels arranged on 15 inches of screen, the resolution it gives us is 43 microns. This is almost double what you could get with its competition. In other words, there is no need to compromise between large size and a high level of detail.


Peopoly Phenom Prime



The Peopoly Phenom Prime is the successor to the Phenom, boasting a 12.5-inch 5K monochrome LCD display that enables fast prints with a resolution (XY) of 51 microns in its 275 x 155 x 400 mm print volume. There is even a larger variant, the Phenom XXL, which offers a build volume of 527 x 296 x 550 mm, albeit with a resolution (XY) of 137 microns.


Peopoly has improved its noise level over its predecessor, the Phenom, by including a newly designed cooling system that reduces the noise level while dissipating the heat produced during printing. With the release of the Mega 8K and the Elegoo Jupiter, it becomes difficult to pay for the Phenom Prime for higher granularity and less print volume, yet it is still an excellent printer.


Phrozen Transform



The Phrozen Transform stands out in the low-budget resin 3D printer sector for its main feature, its changeable LCD panel. The entry-level model features a 13.3-inch RGB LCD display and 4K resolution, capable of producing prints with a resolution (XY) of 74 microns on its 290 x 160 mm build bed. Together with a Z-axis height of 400 mm, the Transform is certainly capable of making prints of considerable size.


Living up to its na